Class 11 Chemistry NCERT Solutions of Chapter 1-Some basic concepts of chemistry - Future Study Point

Class 11 Chemistry NCERT Solutions of Chapter 1-Some basic concepts of chemistry

some concepts of chemistry

Class 11 NCERT solution of chapter 1- Some concepts of chemistry

some concepts of chemistry

Here class 11 chemistry NCERT solutions of chapter 1- Some basic concepts of chemistry are explained for helping class 11 students in their preparation of the exams. All the questions of chapter 1 of class 11 chemistry are explained by an expert of the subject by a step by step method so that every student could understand the solutions of each NCERT question of the chemistry textbook of class 11. These NCERT solutions will help you in clearing your concept of the basic laws of the chemistry.

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NCERT solutions of class 11 maths

Chapter 1-SetsChapter 9-Sequences and Series
Chapter 2- Relations and functionsChapter 10- Straight Lines
Chapter 3- TrigonometryChapter 11-Conic Sections
Chapter 4-Principle of mathematical inductionChapter 12-Introduction to three Dimensional Geometry
Chapter 5-Complex numbersChapter 13- Limits and Derivatives
Chapter 6- Linear InequalitiesChapter 14-Mathematical Reasoning
Chapter 7- Permutations and CombinationsChapter 15- Statistics
Chapter 8- Binomial TheoremChapter 16- Probability

CBSE Class 11-Question paper of maths 2015

CBSE Class 11 – Second unit test of maths 2021 with solutions

Study notes of Maths and Science NCERT and CBSE from class 9 to 12

Class 11 NCERT solutions of Physics and Chemistry

Chapter 1 – Some concepts of the chemistry

Chapter 1-Physical World

Q1. Calculate the molar mass of the following.

Ans.(i) CH4

 

The molecular mass of carbon is = 12.011 u, the molecular mass of hydrogen = 1.oo8 u

The molecular mass of CH4= 1 × 12.011 u + 4× 1.008 u = 12.011 u + 4.032 u = 16.043 u

(ii) H2O

The molecular mass of hydrogen is = 1.008 u, the molecular mass of oxygen = 16.oo u

The molecular mass of H2O= 2 × 1.008 u + 1× 16.00 u =2. 016 u + 16.00 u = 18.016 u

(iii) CO2

The molecular mass of carbon is = 12.011 u, the molecular mass of oxygen = 16.oo u

The molecular mass of CO2= 1× 12.011 u + 2× 16.00 u = 12.011 u + 32.00 u = 44.011 u

Q2. Calculate the mass percent of different elements present in sodium sulphate (Na2SO4).

Ans. Mass of Na in (Na2SO4) = 2× 23.0 = 46 gm/mole of sodium sulphate

Molar mass of (Na2SO4) = 2 × 23.0 u + 1 × 32.066 u + 4 × 16.00 u = 46 u + 32.066 u + 64 u = 142.066 u

 

32.379 ≈ 32.38 %

Mass of sulphur in (Na2SO4) = 1 ×32.066 = 32.066 u

 

22.57 ≈ 22.6 %

Mass of  oxygen  in (Na2SO4) = 4× 23.0 = 92 gm/mole of sodium sulphate

45.049 ≈ 45.05 %

Q3.Determine the empirical formula of an oxide of iron, which has 69.9%  iron and 30.1 % dioxygen by mass.

Ans. The given % of Fe = 69.9%

The atomic  mass of Fe = 55.85 u

Relative no. of moles of Fe

The given % of  O= 30.1%

The atomic mass of Relative no. of moles of Fe16 u

Relative no. of moles of O= 30.1%

The molar ratio between Fe and O

1.25: 1.88

Simple whole number molar ratio

2 : 3

Hence the empirical formula of an oxide of iron is Fe2O3

Q4. Calculate the amount of carbon dioxide that could be produced when
(i) 1 mole of carbon is burnt in air.
(ii) 1 mole of carbon is burnt in 16 g of dioxygen.
(iii) 2 moles of carbon are burnt in 16 g of dioxygen.

Ans. (i) 1 mole of carbon is burnt in air.

The combustion equation of carbon is following

C(s) + O2 (g) ⇒ CO2(g)

12 gm carbon (1 mole) reacts with 32 gm oxygen (1 mole) produces 44 gm of Carbon dioxide(1 mole)

Therefore 44 gm carbon dioxide is produced.

(ii) 1 mole of carbon is burnt in 16 g of dioxygen.

1 mole of carbon when reacts with 32 gm oxygen produces  carbon di oxide= 44 gm

Therefore 1 mole of carbon when reacts with 16 gm oxygen produces carbon dioxide

Hence carbon dioxide produces = 22 gm

(iii) 2 moles of carbon are burnt in 16 g of dioxygen.

1 mole of carbon when reacts with 32 gm of dioxygen produces carbon dioxide = 44 gm

2 moles of carbon = 2 × 12 = 24 gm carbon

12 gm carbon corresponds to 32 gm related to the production of 44 gm carbon dioxide(1 mole)

16 gm of oxygen corresponds to the production of carbon dioxide = 0.5 mole

Since oxygen is limiting reactant here

So, 16 gm oxygen will react with limiting the amount of carbon = 12 × 0.5 = 6 gm carbon

Rest of carbon = 24 -6 = 18 gm will not react

Therefore carbon dioxide produces = 0.5 × 44 = 22 gm

Q5. Calculate the mass of sodium acetate (CH3COONa)  required to make 500 mL of 0.375 molar aqueous solution. The molar mass of sodium acetate is 82.0245 g mol–1.

Ans. 0.375 M aqueous solution means that 1000 ml of the solution contains sodium acetate = 0.375 mole

No. of moles of sodium acetate (CH3COONa) in 500 ml solution

The molar mass of sodium acetate = 82.0245 g mol–1

m = 82.0245 × 0.1875 = 15.38 gm

Therefore required mass of sodium acetate is 15.38 gm

 

Q6.Calculate the concentration of nitric acid in moles per litre in a sample that has a density of 1.41 g mL-1 and the mass per cent of nitric acid in it is being 69%.

Ans. The given mass per cent of nitric acid is = 69 %

There is 69 gm of nitric acid in 100 gm solution of nitric acid

Molar mass of  HNO3) = 1 + 14 + 3 × 16 = 63 gm/mole

Mass = 69 gm

No of moles in 69 gm of nitric acid are = 1.095 mol

The density of nitric acid is = 1.41 gm/l

The volume of 100 gm nitric acid

= 70.92 ml

 

Now let’s find the concentration of nitric acid in moles /litre also known as the molarity of the solution

Conc. of nitric acid in moles /litre

Q7. How much copper can be obtained from 100 g of copper sulphate (CuSO4 )? (Atomic mass of Cu= 63.5 amu)

Ans.

1 mole of CuSo4 contains 1 mole (1 g atom) of Cu

Molar Mass of CuSo4 = 63.5 + 32 +4 × 16 = 159.5 g mol-1

Thus, Cu that can be obtained from 159.5 g  of CuSo4 = 63.5 g

Therefore Cu that can be obtained from 100 g of CuSo4

Q8.Determine the molecular formula of an oxide of iron in which the mass per cent of iron and oxygen are 69.9 and 30.1 respectively. Given that the molar mass of the oxide is 159.8 g mol-1(Atomic mass: Fe = 55.85, O = 16.00 amu) Calculation of Empirical Formula. See Q3.

Ans. Empirical formula mass of Fe2O3 = 2 × 55.85 + 3 × 16.00 = 159.7 mol-1

Hence, molecular formula is same as empirical formula, viz, Fe20

 

Q9.Calculate the atomic mass (average) of chlorine using the following data:

 

%  Natural AbundanceMolar Mass
75.7734.9689
24.2336.9659

 

Ans.

Fractional abundance of  35Cl = 0.7577,Molar mass = 34.9689

Average atomic mass of Cl

Therefore, average atomic mass =(0.7577) (34.9689 amu) + (0.2423) (36.9659 amu)

= 26.4959 + 8.9568 = 35.4527

Therefore the average atomic mass of chlorine =35.4527 u

Q10. In three moles of ethane (C2H6), calculate the following:
(i) Number of moles of carbon atoms (ii) Number of moles of hydrogen atoms
(iii) Number of molecules of ethane

Ans.(i)1 mole of C2H6 contains 2 moles of carbon atoms

3 moles of C2H6 will C-atoms =6 moles

(ii) 1 mole of C2H6 contains H-atoms = 18 moles

3 moles of C2H6  will contain H-atoms = 18 moles

(iii) In 1 mole of ethane the number of molecules of ethane = 6.023 × 1023

In 3 moles of ethane the number of molecules of ethane = 3 × 6.023 × 1023=18 .069 × 1023

Q11.What is the concentration of sugar (C12H22O11) in mol -1 if its 20 g are dissolved in enough water to make a final volume up to 2 L?

Ans.  No of moles of sugar

Mass of sugar  = 20 gm

Molar mass of sugar(C12H22O11) =  12 × 12 + 22 × 1 + 11 ×  16 = 144 + 22 + 176 = 342 gm/mole

No. of moles of sugar

Molarity of sugar

Volume of solution = 2L

Hence concentration of sugar (C12H22O11) = 0.0293 mole/litre

 

Q12. If the density of methanol is 0.793 kg -1, what is its volume needed for making 2.5 L of its 0.25 M solution?

Ans. The density of methanol = 0.793 kg L-1) = 793 gm L-1)

Molar mass of methanol (CH3OH) = 12 + 3 + 16 + 1 = 32 gm

According to titration equation

Where   and    are the initial molarity and initial volume of the solution and and are the final molarity and volume of the solution.

  = 24.78 mol/L,   = ?,    = 0.25 M = 0.25 mol/L,   = 2L

24.78 ×   = 0.25 × 2.5

 

0.02522 L = 25.22 ml

Hence required volume to be added is = 25.22 ml

Q13.Pressure is determined as force per unit area of the surface. The S.I. unit of pressure, pascal, is as shown below:1 Pa = 1 Nm-2.If mass of air at sea level is 1034 g cm-2,calculate the pressure in pascal.

Ans. Pressure is defined as follows

   

Where F is the force, A is the area, P is the pressure

Mass of air in per unit area is given = 1034 g cm-2)

So, A = 1 cm² = 10-4 m2

m = 1034 gm = 1.034 kg, g = 9.8 m/s²

F = mg  = 1.034 × 9.8 kg ms-1= 10.1332 kg ms-1

1 N = 1 kg m s-2

1 Pa = 1 Nm-2

1 Pa = 1 kg m-1s-2

Therefore the pressure of air in pascal = 1.01332 x 10-5 Pa

Q14.What is the SI unit of mass? How is it defined?

Ans. SI unit of mass is kilogram.

Q15.  Match the following prefixes with their multiples:

PrefixesMultiples
Micro106
Deca109
Mega10-6
Giga10-15
Femto10

Ans.

PrefixesMultiples
Micro10-6
Deca10
Mega106
Giga109
Femto10-15

 

Q16. What do you mean by significant figures?

Ans. The Significant figures are the meaningful digits which are known with certainty. Significant figures indicate uncertainty in the experimented value.

As an example suppose the result of an experiment is 23.5, total significant figures are 3

103.50, in this outcome the significant figures are 5

0.0056, in this outcome the significant figures are 2 because 0’s before 5 are not significant.

5600. has only 2 significant figure, trailing 0’s in a number without decimal are not significant.

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NCERT Solutions for class 9 maths

Chapter 1- Number SystemChapter 9-Areas of parallelogram and triangles
Chapter 2-PolynomialChapter 10-Circles
Chapter 3- Coordinate GeometryChapter 11-Construction
Chapter 4- Linear equations in two variablesChapter 12-Heron’s Formula
Chapter 5- Introduction to Euclid’s GeometryChapter 13-Surface Areas and Volumes
Chapter 6-Lines and AnglesChapter 14-Statistics
Chapter 7-TrianglesChapter 15-Probability
Chapter 8- Quadrilateral

NCERT Solutions for class 9 science 

Chapter 1-Matter in our surroundingsChapter 9- Force and laws of motion
Chapter 2-Is matter around us pure?Chapter 10- Gravitation
Chapter3- Atoms and MoleculesChapter 11- Work and Energy
Chapter 4-Structure of the AtomChapter 12- Sound
Chapter 5-Fundamental unit of lifeChapter 13-Why do we fall ill ?
Chapter 6- TissuesChapter 14- Natural Resources
Chapter 7- Diversity in living organismChapter 15-Improvement in food resources
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NCERT Solutions for class 10 maths

Chapter 1-Real numberChapter 9-Some application of Trigonometry
Chapter 2-PolynomialChapter 10-Circles
Chapter 3-Linear equationsChapter 11- Construction
Chapter 4- Quadratic equationsChapter 12-Area related to circle
Chapter 5-Arithmetic ProgressionChapter 13-Surface areas and Volume
Chapter 6-TriangleChapter 14-Statistics
Chapter 7- Co-ordinate geometryChapter 15-Probability
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Chapter 1- Chemical reactions and equationsChapter 9- Heredity and Evolution
Chapter 2- Acid, Base and SaltChapter 10- Light reflection and refraction
Chapter 3- Metals and Non-MetalsChapter 11- Human eye and colorful world
Chapter 4- Carbon and its CompoundsChapter 12- Electricity
Chapter 5-Periodic classification of elementsChapter 13-Magnetic effect of electric current
Chapter 6- Life ProcessChapter 14-Sources of Energy
Chapter 7-Control and CoordinationChapter 15-Environment
Chapter 8- How do organisms reproduce?Chapter 16-Management of Natural Resources

NCERT Solutions for class 11 maths

Chapter 1-SetsChapter 9-Sequences and Series
Chapter 2- Relations and functionsChapter 10- Straight Lines
Chapter 3- TrigonometryChapter 11-Conic Sections
Chapter 4-Principle of mathematical inductionChapter 12-Introduction to three Dimensional Geometry
Chapter 5-Complex numbersChapter 13- Limits and Derivatives
Chapter 6- Linear InequalitiesChapter 14-Mathematical Reasoning
Chapter 7- Permutations and CombinationsChapter 15- Statistics
Chapter 8- Binomial Theorem Chapter 16- Probability

CBSE Class 11-Question paper of maths 2015

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NCERT Solutions for Class 11 Physics

Chapter 1- Physical World

chapter 3-Motion in a Straight Line

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Chapter 1-Some basic concepts of chemistry

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Chapter 1-Relations and FunctionsChapter 9-Differential Equations
Chapter 2-Inverse Trigonometric FunctionsChapter 10-Vector Algebra
Chapter 3-MatricesChapter 11 – Three Dimensional Geometry
Chapter 4-DeterminantsChapter 12-Linear Programming
Chapter 5- Continuity and DifferentiabilityChapter 13-Probability
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